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Water in Toledo, Ohio, Remains Undrinkable Pending More Tests
Ohio National Guard soldiers prepare to deliver water to Toledo residents after toxins were found in the city's water supply.
August 4th, 2014
04:31 AM ET

Water in Toledo, Ohio, Remains Undrinkable Pending More Tests

Residents of Ohio's fourth-largest city will have to wait a little longer to use their tap water.

Tests conducted by both the state and federal Environmental Protection Agency showed high levels of toxin levels in two neighborhoods in Toledo, Mayor D. Michael Collins said early Monday.

Instead of isolating the two neighborhoods, the Mayor said he'll keep the ban on drinking or using tap water in the entire city of Toledo until additional retests are completed. He declined to provide specifics on the name of neighborhoods in question and how high the toxin levels are.

"A majority of areas are satisfactory, but we have two areas of concern," he said at a news conference.

As many as 400,000 people were told not to consume, cook with or boil the tap water after a toxin called microcystin was found in the water supply Friday. Collins told reporters the advisories will remain in effect until further notice

Toledo's drinking water comes from Lake Erie, where a harmful algae bloom that causes microcystin has been growing.

The city has set up distribution centers for potable water, where members of the Ohio National Guard, fire officials and other first responders are giving out safe water.

About 350 Ohio National Guardsmen have been activated by the governor, according to a U.S. Defense Department official, adding that they have set up three Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit sites at two high schools and a police facility. The guardsmen have also delivered ready-to-eat meals, the official said.

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Filed under: Ohio • Water
February 3rd, 2014
06:19 AM ET

Volcanic Ash Smothers Part of Indonesia, Kills 15

The 15 victims simply couldn't outrun the searing debris that billowed out of Indonesia's Mount Sinabung.

Plumes of ash had spewed more than a mile into the sky Saturday and descended in superheated clouds. Scalding ash up to 700 degrees in temperature raced down the slope in just two to three minutes.

By the end of several eruptions, at least 15 people had been killed, a government official told CNN. It was the first time Mount Sinabung's volcanic output had resulted in deaths, the Jakarta Post reported.

On Sunday, the sky above the North Sumatra mountain was still the color of murky gray ash, as shown on video from the Indonesia Geologic Agency.

The victims, and at least three other injured people, were all found in Sukameriah, a village close to the volcano's crater, disaster mitigation agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho told CNN.

Local search-and-rescue teams were scheduled to go on a recovery operation Sunday, he said.

Eruptions at Mount Sinabung are becoming common. After about 400 years of minimal volcanic activity there, Sinabung erupted in 2010. It has been emitting gas since September.

The English-language Jakarta Post said while 31 people previously had died from eruption-related illnesses such as asthma and hypertension.

The unpredictable volcanic volatility has meant an itinerant existence for those who live in this region a 2½ hour flight from Jakarta. Last month, intensifying volcanic activity forced 22,000 people into temporary camps, but more than half were allowed to return home on Friday.

The newest volcanic activity has forced people to evacuate 16 villages, the Jakarta Post reported. At least 30,000 people have been temporarily housed at 42 evacuation centers, according to Billy Sumuan, the emergency response director in Indonesia for the humanitarian group World Vision.

Saturday's victims lived within a 3-kilometer radius of the volcano. Some were there checking on their homes or were there just to watch the eruptions, Nugroho said. Others were students and volunteers in the region to help its beleaguered people, Sumuan said.

The government had issued the highest level of alert for the latest eruptions, and Sumuan noted that no one was supposed to go inside a 5-kilometer zone around the volcano.