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October 7th, 2013
06:03 AM ET

U.S. Terror Raids: Two Operations. Two Outcomes. Many Questions

Two secret blitzes. Two high-value targets. Two very different outcomes.

U.S. forces conducted dual raids on northern and eastern coasts of Africa over the weekend in the hunt for two suspected terrorists: Abu Anas al Libi, a suspected al Qaeda operative wanted for the deadly 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa; and an Al-Shabaab foreign fighter commander named Ikrima.

American forces snatched al Libi in the Libyan capital Saturday morning. But 3,000 miles away, the plan to catch Ikrima didn't go as planned. Navy SEALs came under heavy fire during their raid and had to retreat - not knowing whether Ikrima was dead or alive

SEE FULL STORY 

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Filed under: Africa • Air Force • Terrorism
May 7th, 2013
07:15 AM ET

Air Force official who served as branch chief for Sexual Assault Prevention program arrested on sexual assault charges – Barbara Starr reports

(CNN) - An Air Force officer who served as a branch chief for the service's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program was arrested and charged with sexual battery over the weekend.

Lt. Col. Jeffrey Krusinski, 41, has been removed from current duty, an Air Force official said Monday. The official declined to be named because it is an ongoing law enforcement matter.

Krusinski was placed in charge of a section of the service's sexual assault prevention and response program in February, running a five-person office, the Air Force official said.

He was arrested just after midnight Saturday in Arlington, Virginia, and is accused of grabbing a woman's breasts and buttocks, Arlington County police said. Police said the woman fought off her assailant when he tried to grab her again before she called authorities. ...

Krusinski's arrest comes as the Pentagon has been under closer scrutiny from Congress over its handling of sexual assault cases in the uniformed services.

READ MORE: Hagel: 'Outrage, disgust' as Air Force leader charged with sexual battery

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Filed under: Air Force • Crime
August 14th, 2012
06:23 AM ET

Air Force's unmanned hypersonic Waverider flight test to be 'fastest hunk of junk in galaxy'? Barbara Starr on what it could mean for future air travel

It's not often that we get to reference "Star Wars" on the show, but when engineers say they're going to test an unmanned aircraft and have it fly at five times the speed of sound, it just seems appropriate.

This morning on "Early Start," CNN Pentagon correspondent Barbara Starr explained why engineers and geeks are excited about the Air Force's unmanned hypersonic test flight of the X-51A "Waverider" aircraft off the coast of California today.

Aerospace engineers are hoping they can keep the aircraft flying for five minutes at Mach 6, or about 4,500 miles per hour...five times the speed of sound. That's fast enough to fly from New York to London in less than an hour. If the test flight is successful, it could usher in the next generation of missiles, military aircraft, spacecraft and maybe even passenger planes.

Starr says the Pentagon believes this is the kind of military technology that would give the U.S. an advantage. The practical applications can be related to recent examples. Starr relates it to one operation in 1998, when the government used Tomahawk missiles to attack a camp they believed Osama Bin Laden was training at. By the time they arranged everything to send to the target, Bin Laden was long gone. Starr explains that this type of flight would compresses military decision making time to within minutes.

With the Waverider test, the Air Force wants to see if this type of flight is feasible. If it is, the U.S. military could be looking at putting missiles and potentially troops on target within minutes and hours.

See Starr's report on "Early Start" this morning in the video above.


Filed under: Air Force • Air travel • Engineering • Military